Gallery

Vegan Fest FOMO

We love taking part in Vegan Festivals & Events cos it’s a great time for us to catch up with our #Festies and hang out with our customers and also a great time for everyone to pick up a bargain! If you missed Brighton VegFest, here’s what you missed …

It is always fun, even when it’s not 😉 … We shall see you at the next one

Advertisements

Did you guys get down to London VegFest this weekend?

1380886918256

It has been a busy few months at HQ. We have been busy formulating, packing, updating, expanding … basically gearing up to world domination 🙂 There is so much news to tell you, which we will be sharing with you in the next few weeks, but first …

This weekend the #OrangeFrog held a stand at London Veg Fest, and it was awesome! For those of you who don’t know VegFest, it is basically a festival that celebrates all things vegan and vegetarian. There are loads of talks about vegetarian and vegan lifestyle, vegan food, vegan clothing, vegan chocolate, vegan bodybuilders, vegan cupcakes, vegan sword-swallowers and did we mention loads of yummy vegan food!

The great thing about VegFest is you get to meet loads of new people, especially the charities that hold stalls at the event. One of the great charities we met are called Save The Harlan Beagles . They are campaigning against Harlan UK which breeds beagles for animal testing ONLY. Saying it is horrific is not even touching it! In 2011 The Sunday Times ran an expose with a former Harlan employee, where he exposed what life is like for these poor animals. To read more visit their website and please support their work!

Our other neighbours were the Wild Futures charity. They campaign to help end the suffering of thousands of primates in the UK by working towards ensuring that the UK primate pet trade is made illegal. Check out their campaign and sign their petition.

We met Metala at Vegan Faces UK, who had some lovely vegan hypoallergenic face paints for kids as well as loads of lovely make-up. Alan Sugar loves her stuff and we can see why! Other great stand holders were Buddha Beauty , Animal Aid , Teen VGN , Razzle Dazzle Ice Cream , Mimi’s Miracles , Nakd , Trina’s Delicacies , too many to mention!

It was an awesome day and we met some of our lovely regular customers, catch up with mates, and bought loads of food, which are all featured on our facebook album. If you didn’t get to visit us this time round, come and see us at our next event on the 19th October 2013 at the LABL Fair in Liverpool.

Till next time!

Where will the ORANGE FROG pop up next?

20130608_125500Hi All, just wanted to give everyone a quick events update ….

We had a blast at the London Allergy Show 2013, 7-9th June 2013, and we met loads of great people who were taking advantage of the massive show discounts and stocking up on all the goodies we had at the show. We made some fab connections and in case you missed it, have a look at our FB album to see some of what you missed … https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.531075350285082.1073741829.110942912298330&type=1&l=83e258912c

 

ImageSo where to next?

If anyone is in London this weekend feel free to check out the Transitions Belsize Event.

Event Details:

Sat 22 Jun 11:00am -4:00pm
Budgens, 200 Haverstock Hill,
London, NW3 4RS

Transition Belsize will be at the Budgens London fair on Saturday June 22nd from 11am-4pm.  We will be giving away free vegetable seedlings with every copy of the Transition Free Press newspaper.  The London Fair will include a range of local suppliers, live music, hot food including hand made butchers sausages and burgers, freshly squeezed orange juice and virgin cocktails, local organisations and communities, a book giveaway and Henna and face painting for the little ones.  The theme is London, continuing the celebration of our cosmopolitan city from last year’s Jubilee and Olympics, hope to see you there!

ImageAnd after that …

We will be saying hi and introducing everyone to our soapnuts on stand 157 at the BabyExpo Brighton ~ June 30, Brighton Racecourse & Conference Centre, Sussex. 

There will be over 150 exhibitors, fabulous marquee (hosting the stage area and exhibits), the Grandstand & Premier Halls, outside areas, displays & stalls, family-friendly catering + a very special Humphrey’s Corner event!

To get a free ticket (hurry limited supply) please use this link or click on the big pink invite over there > http://www.babyexpobabyshow.co.uk/visiting/visitingviptickets/

And there will be loads more coming up throughout July & August cos that’s HOW WE ROLL! So stay tuned to see where the ORANGE FROG will pop up next!

 

 

Guide to Essential Oils

Essential Oil

On our soapnut website we recommend using essential oils for quite a few of our soapnut recipes, so I thought I would talk some more about essential oils, their properties, what they are great for and what they are not so good for!

History of Essential Oils

Essential oils are the subtle, aromatic and volatile liquids extracted from the flowers, seeds, leaves, stems, bark and roots of herbs, bushes, shrubs and trees through distillation. In the craft of alchemy, the soul of a plant is its oil, while its spirit is the plant’s alcohol or tincture. According to ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics and Chinese manuscripts, priests and alchemists were using essential oils thousands of years ago to heal the sick. They are the oldest form of medicine and cosmetic known to man and were considered more valuable than gold to the ancients.

What are essential oils?

Essential oils are the concentrated form of what is sometimes called the blood of the plant. The ‘blood’ is very complex and contains as many different chemicals as our blood and it is loaded with oxygen. Part of the health impact of essential oils has been attributed to this concentration of oxygen, which boosts the ability of our cells to metabolize allergens, toxins, or stress and thus supports the health of all the systems of the human body.

Essential oils are not oily (despite the name) and they will not make your hands greasy. Instead, they rub right into the skin. They are called oils because, like oil, they combine with other fats and oils, and do not mix easily with water.

Interesting fact: the easiest way to remove an essential oil, if you experience a reaction or hate the smell, is to dilute it using a pure vegetable oil (such as olive, almond, or jojoba) or even butter. Using water will only drive essential oils into the body more strongly.

uses of essential oil

Uses of essential oil

Uses of Essential Oils

Here is our brief guide to some of the most popular essential oils and how they will contribute to your well-being. Try them in your soapnut laundry, soapnut liquid or soapnut shampoo!

Lavender: This is the great aromatherapy all-rounder. The essential oil is obtained by distillation. Lavender oils blend well with other essential oils and can boost their properties. Great for: aches, pains, sun burn, acne, depression, irritability, migraines, colds, period pain and stomach aches.

Bergamot: This is a member of the citrus family and the oil is extracted by pressing the peel of the fruit. Bergamot essence is used to make Earl Grey tea and gives it its characteristic perfume. Bergamot is a powerful antiseptic and an appetite stimulant. It must not be used neat on the skin because it can cause pigmentation marks.
Great for: psoriasis, oily / spotty skin, cystitis, cold sores

Geranium: There are many varieties of geranium. Essential oil is usually extracted from the Pelargonium family, but wild geranium – known as Herb Robert- is also used. The oil is distilled from all parts of the plant. Geranium oil is a good balancer. It can uplift or have a relaxing effect and is particularly good for menopausal problems.
Great for: eczema, dermatitis, sore throat, sluggish skin, nervous tension

Ylang-Ylang: This tree is native to the Philippines and other parts of the Far East. The essential oil is obtained from the flowers by steam distillation. This is another oil used by the perfume industry as it has a lovely, exotic floral fragrance. It has a relaxing, sedative effect and is a pleasant oil to use in a burner to scent your home. Ylang­ ylang is said to have aphrodisiac powers! Great for: depression, nervous tension, insomnia, fear, panic attacks, high blood pressure.

Lemon: It takes 3,000 lemons to produce 2 pound (1 kilo) of essential oil. It is extracted by pressing the rind of the fruit. Hand-pressed oil is of a better quality than mechanically pressed oil. Hand pressing is a family affair. The women and children cut the lemons and scrape out the flesh, the men do the pressing. Great for: cold sores, bites, stings, warts, colds, mouth ulcers.

peppermint leaf

Peppermint: The oil is obtained from the leaves and flowers by steam distillation and varies in quality depending on climatic and soil conditions. It is a very therapeutic oil which has a cooling effect on the skin and lessens pain. You’ll notice most commerical indigestion cures are mint­flavoured. Peppermint is excellent for digestive problems. It also makes a great foot bath for hot, aching feet. Great for: migraines, travel sickness, indigestion, sinus, heartburn.

Rosemary: A well known herb, rosemary is cultivated in France, Spain, etc. The essential oils are distilled from the flowers and leaves. It is known as the herb for remembrance and clears the mind and stimulates the memory. It is an excellent hair tonic, improving circulation to the scalp, and is helpful for dandruff. Great for: mental fatigue, poor memory, dandruff, circulation.

Tea Tree: The tea tree is native to Australia and the oil is distilled from the leaves. This oil is an excellent antiseptic, 12 to 15 times more potent than carbolic. When applied neat to a cut, its antiseptic potency doubles! Keep this one in your first aid box.Great for: spots, athlete’s foot, thrush, cuts, sore throat.

Hyssop: Hyssop is an ancient herb which was cultivated for its medicinal as well as romantic properties. The oil is extracted from the leaves and flowers by distillation. It is beneficial for ‘all respiratory problems and can help relieve hayfever. Great for: Hayfever, eczema, rheumatism.

Camomile: The camomile family is large and there are several different camomile essential oils. German camomile is the most expensive, but all camomile oils are helpful for sensitive conditions and can be- used safely for children. Camomile tea is widely available, and the plant feverfew – belonging to the camomile family – is now being used to help migraine sufferers. Great for: sore eyes, aches, hyperactivity, dermatitis, eczema, insmonia.

Make sure you read the safety info because some oils are not safe for pregnant women!

Belsize Eco Week

Belsize Eco Week

Transition Belsize

Saturday was a great end to a great week of green at Belsize. If you missed it…it was a day of eco awareness including learning how to compost effectively, cook wild foods, build a plastic bottle greenhouse and there were farm animals and bees!

Check our facebook page for some photos…but here are some tips of 5 things we could all do from Transitions Belsize the organisers of the week….

Fly and drive less: Try to take holidays by train rather than plane; jet engines create more greenhouse gases than anything else we do. If you do fly, pay an environmental charity like Pure or Climate Care to offset the carbon for your flight. Consider joining a car club; it will almost certainly save you money.

Get closer to your food: Grow food on your window sill, balcony or in your garden. Join The Transition Belsize Garden Share scheme matching up unused gardens with wannabe allotment holders. If you live on a housing estate, set up a gardening club. Try to buy local, seasonal and, if possible, organic. Sign up for a fruit and vegetable box scheme. Avoid airfreighted fresh food. Ask restaurants, cafes and shops where your food is coming from and whether it’s sustainably sourced.

Eat less meat especially beef: Eat less meat and dairy because producing it is so energy-intensive. The livestock industry is responsible for 18% of the world’s carbon emissions. That’s partly because cows burp and fart so much methane. But it’s also because of the fossil fuels that are used to grow and process cattle food, to refrigerate and transport meat that is then sold in open fridges/freezers in supermarkets. Eating less meat can also benefit your health.

Insulate your home and switch to a renewable energy contract: Insulate your home and switch to a renewable energy contract. Install draught exclusion measures around doors and windows, lag your hot water tank, and put in cavity wall and loft insulation wherever possible. Best of all install internal or external wall insulation, under floor insulation and double glazing. Contact the Transition Belsize Draught Busting Team to take part in a free workshop to learn how to make your home more energy efficient. Switch your electricity supply to a renewable energy provider. Talk to the Belsize Energy Company about fitting solar panels to your roof and taking advantage of the new national. Feed In Tariff designed to subside Micro generation.

Join a campaigning group: Last but definitely not least – get involved with your local Transition group, Transition Belsize, which is working towards a greener vision for our area. See here for more on the Transition movement: www.transitionnetwork.org

Join a group campaigning for action on climate change like Friends of the Earth, Greenpeace, WWF or the Soil Association.

Belsize Eco Week has been organised by Transition Belsize – http://www.transitionbelsize.org.uk

Fly and drive less
Try to take holidays by train rather
than plane; jet engines create more
greenhouse gases than anything
else we do. If you do fly, pay an
environmental charity like Pure or
Climate Care to offset the carbon for
your flight. Consider joining a car club;
it will almost certainly save you money.
Get closer to your food
Grow food on your window sill, balcony
or in your garden. Join The Transition
Belsize Garden Share scheme
matching up unused gardens with
wannabe allotment holders. If you live
on a housing estate, set up a gardening
club. Try to buy local, seasonal and,
if possible, organic. Sign up for a fruit
and vegetable box scheme. Avoid airfreighted
fresh food. Ask restaurants,
cafes and shops where your food is
coming from and whether it’s sustainably
sourced.
Eat less meat especially beef
Eat less meat and dairy because
producing it is so energy-intensive.
The livestock industry is responsible
for 18% of the world’s carbon
emissions. That’s partly because
cows burp and fart so much methane.
But it’s also because of the fossil fuels
that are used to grow and process cattle
food, to refrigerate and transport meat
that is then sold in open fridges/freezers
in supermarkets. Eating less meat can
also benefit your health.
Insulate your home and switch to
a renewable energy contract
Insulate your home and switch to
a renewable energy contract
Install draught exclusion measures
around doors and windows, lag your
hot water tank, and put in cavity wall
and loft insulation wherever possible.
Best of all install internal or external wall
insulation, under floor insulation
and double glazing. Contact the
Transition Belsize Draught Busting Team
to take part in a free workshop to learn
how to make your home more energy
efficient. Switch your electricity supply
to a renewable energy provider. Talk
to the Belsize Energy Company about
fitting solar panels to your roof and
taking advantage of the new national
Feed In Tariff designed to subside
Micro generation.
Join a campaigning group
Last but definitely not least – get
involved with your local Transition
group, Transition Belsize, which is
working towards a greener vision for
our area. See here for more on the
Transition movement:
http://www.transitionnetwork.org
Join a group campaigning for action on
climate change like Friends of the
Earth, Greenpeace, WWF or the Soil
Association.
Belsize Eco Week has been organised
by Transition Belsize –
http://www.transitionbelsize.org.uk

Soap Nut Powder Recipes

soapnut powder

ground soapnut powder

Simply grind soap nuts shells to a very fine powder in a coffee grinder. A similar appliance will work, such as a blender, however a coffee grinder tends to produce the finest powder. This may require grinding the soap nut shells a couple of times. Remove any un-ground pieces or sift through a sifter. Place in airtight container. Shelf life is indefinite as long as the soap nut powder is stored in a cool dry place.

For skin allergies like eczema, use soap nut powder instead of regular body soap. It does not lather much but cleans the grime from your body while staying mild and safe for your sensitive skin. The saponin essence works against harmful microbes that cause allergic reactions.

Soapnut Powder Wash : Use equal amounts of soapnut powder and water and mix into paste and wash as normal. The paste will not lather as you may be used to but it will clean you up very nicely. PLEASE KEEP AWAY FROM THE EYES.

Soapnut Body Scrub : Use 1 cup of soapnut powder, half cup raw sugar, 2-3 tablespoons of massage oil (jojoba, wheatgerm) or olive oil. Mix and store in a clean airtight plastic or glass jar. Use whenever you want beautifully clean and smooth skin.

*Tip *– Also use the powder to wash your laundry *: When you have ground this powder down really fine, you can use also use it in the washbag to do your laundry. 2-3 tablespoon will be enough for one wash load.

Soapnut Liquid Recipe

making soapnut liquid

making soapnut liquid

Using soap nut shells to make a multi-purpose liquid

Boiling 50g of soapnuts with 1 litre of liquid for 20 minutes will give you 500ml of a good concentrated soapnut liquid.  When cooled, remove the soap nuts, and pour the liquid into an airtight plastic or glass jar. You can re-boil the same 50g of soapnuts three more times and get over 2 litres of soapnut liquid! Awesome value!

Liquid may have a strong smell, but this will disappear once you have added 10-20 drops of your favourite essential oil.

*Tip – reuse, reuse, reuse *: After you have made the soapnut liquid there will still be saponin in the shell, so use these in your laundry as usual. You can either put them in a small muslin bag/old sock and wash as directed or blend them up with some water, strain and use in the machine as soapnut laundry liquid. Alternatively you can pour the blended soapnuts straight from the blender to your garden to guard from pests and snails.

Storing Soapnut Liquid

To store soapnut liquid either keep it in jugs/containers in your fridge or you can freeze them into soapnut ice cubes and use them either in your washing machine or dishwasher. As the homemade soapnut liquid will have no preservatives, it will keep for a few weeks in the fridge, but will stay indefinitely if you add essential oils to it.

For more ways to use for laundry or more soapnut recipes visit www.soapnuts.co.uk